Book Review: Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay

9780312370848 Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay is a brilliant and beautiful novel about a horrific and under-reported event that took place during WWII, the Vel’d’Hiv’ roundup of more than 13,000 French Jews in Paris by the French police. Told alternately from Sarah’s point of view in 1942 and that of Julia Jarmond, a modern day American journalist researching the event for it’s 60th anniversary, Ms. de Rosnay seamlessly weaves the two stories together.

At 10, “the girl” has heard her parents whispering anxiously about roundups and camps and arrests, but they haven’t told her anything directly. When the French police come in the middle of the night demanding “Open up! Police! Now!”, she does not understand. She sees it is not the Nazis coming for them and believes they will straighten it all out and come home in a few hours. Her 4 year old brother, terrified, climbs into his hiding place in a long cupboard and the girl, thinking she is protecting him, locks him in and pockets the key, promising him she’ll be back soon. The rest of the family is taken away as neighbors watch, some mocking them, a few standing up for them and demanding to know why.

The girl and her family are taken with thousands of others, mostly women and children, to the Velodrome d’Hiver, an indoor cycle track in Paris, as a holding place before boarding buses for concentration camps hours away. They are kept there for days without food, toilet facilities, medical care, or blankets in overcrowded and inhumane conditions before being paraded through town and onto buses- the same town buses they had used to go to school and to the market- and driven away to camps as the Parisians watched. At the camps, first the men are separated from their families. Piece by piece their lives are chipped away. Weeks later, in a gut wrenching scene, the women are brutally and forcibly separated from their children. The adults are taken to Auschwitz and the children, even babies and toddlers, are left to fend for themselves. All this time the girl is consumed with guilt and fear for her brother, who she believes is still locked in the cupboard. She vows to get back to him.

Sarah is called “the girl” in the book until page 132, when she finally begins to feel safe and treated as a person again. I was riveted by Sarah’s chapters, but not as much by Julia’s, the American journalist, although I think interweaving the two was a very effective way to tell this story. We are allowed to see the Parisian’s modern day apathy, their lack of emotion or knowledge of events that took place right in their own city. Julia is stunned to discover a personal connection to the Vel’d’Hiv’ roundup. As she unravels family secrets and her story begins to intersect with Sarah’s, her marriage starts to disintegrate. Told in parallel, I found myself racing through Julia’s parts to get back to Sarah. When halfway through the book Sarah’s chapters abruptly end, I was distressed and frustrated, wanting to get back to her story. What had happened to Sarah? It took the rest of the book to find out.

This book is so compelling and I highly recommend it. I love when historical fiction teaches us something new, and this tragic event in Paris was something I’d never heard about. The ending seems a little too perfect and coincidental, but I loved it, and I’ve heard the movie rights have been optioned. I can’t wait to see this story on the big screen.

Our book club was supposed to discuss the book two weeks ago but something came up for our hostess, so we’ll be discussing it tomorrow. I’ll do a book club wrap-up post here in a few days.

Check out my book club’s Q & A with Tatiana de Rosnay HERE.

Discussion questions for Sarah’s Key can be found HERE.

If you’re interested in this subject you might also like The Boy In the Striped Pajamas, reviewed HERE.

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22 Responses

  1. [...] for our book club meeting, we asked Tatiana de Rosnay, author of Sarah’s Key, reviewed here, if she would answer a few questions for us, and she graciously agreed.  Here are our questions [...]

  2. I’m really looking forward to reading this one.

  3. I loved this book. It was such an emotional read. I agree though that Sarah’s parts were much more riveting. My only disappointment was that the last part of the book dealth only with Julia’s narrative. I would have liked to have known more about Sarah through Sarah’s eyes and emotions when she went on to be married, etc. All in all though, one of my favorite books this year.

  4. [...] it! Darlene on Book Review: Sarah’s Ke…Planet Books on Book Club Q & A with Tatia…bermudaonion on Book Review: Sarah’s [...]

  5. [...] for our book club meeting, we asked Tatiana de Rosnay, author of Sarah’s Key, reviewed here, if she would answer a few questions for us, and she graciously agreed. But beware- there are a few [...]

  6. [...] for our book club meeting, we asked Tatiana de Rosnay, author of Sarah’s Key, reviewed here, if she would answer a few questions for us, and she graciously agreed.  But beware- there are a [...]

  7. [...] will be mixing up the margaritas (she claims to be a pro!) and then we’ll sit down to discuss Sarah’s Key. We’re sending the kids (hers and mine) and my husband across the street to another book club [...]

  8. [...] will be mixing up the margaritas (she claims to be a pro!) and then we’ll sit down to discuss Sarah’s Key. We’re sending the kids (hers and mine) and my husband across the street to another book club [...]

  9. I’ve got tis waiting to be read. I keep putting it off because it sounds so distressing.

  10. this is one of my books right beside my bed that is waiting its turn to be read!

  11. [...] Books on the Brain: Sarah’s Key – the reviewer’s book club asked Tatiana de Rosnay a series of questions here: Q & A with Tatiana de Rosnay [...]

  12. I really liked this one, too, and I’ll be posting my review this week. I hope it’s okay that I linked to your review on War Through the Generations.

    –Anna

  13. [...] discussion;  we meet on the 30th.  According to my goodreads.com, I tbr’d this after reading Lisa’s review at Books on the Brain.    I quote Lisa here as she initially describes this book as: “…   a brilliant [...]

  14. [...] Books on the Brain [...]

  15. omg!!! i loved this book so much..!!! i was cryng in the end ;'(

  16. [...] #2 Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay 304 p. More tan 50 available in OSLRI Review from Books on the Brain Blog [...]

  17. [...] Sarah’s Key by Tatiana De Rosnay [...]

  18. This is a book that appears to be written by two different authors. It started off as a terrific read, and exactly half way through it sank into a corny and maudlin soap opera. All I could think of when I finished it was that de Rosnay lost interest in her project and hired a ghost writer to finish the book for her. She should have stayed with her original device of going back and forth between past and present with each chapter, and avoided the whole subject of Julia’s pregnancy, her husband’s infidelity, and family infighting. She could have worked William into the plot in a much better way if she stayed with her original concept. Instead, she turned a very good book into a very mediocre one.

    • I TOTALLY AGREE: IT QUICKLY BECAME A “CHICK-LIT” BOOK ABOUT M,ARITAL WOES AND PERSONAL GRIEF THAT HAD NO RELEVANCE TO THE ORIGINAL THEME, WHICH, BY THE WAY, HAS ALREADY BEEN EXPLORED WITH FAR GEATER LITERARY SKILL THAN THIS AUTHOR COULD ONLY DREAM OF. tHE DIALOGUE, DESCRIPTIVE PASSAGES AND CULTURAL INSIGHTS ARE MUNDANE, JUVENILE AND MINDFUL OF PAPER BACK NOVELS.
      RATING: -** ( I.E.; MINUS TWO STARS

  19. [...] Reviews: The Book Nest, Books on the Brain, Boston Bibliophile, Rhapsody in Books Weblog, She Is Too Fond of Books, and more at the Book Blogs [...]

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